relate

relate vb
1 Relate, rehearse, recite, recount, narrate, describe, state, report are comparable when they mean to tell orally or in writing the details or circumstances necessary to others' understanding or knowledge of a real or imagined situation or combination of events.
Relate implies the giving of a usually detailed or orderly account of something one has witnessed or experienced
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related the story of his life

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then Father Junipero and his companion related fully their adventure— Cather

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Rehearse usually suggests a repetition; it may imply a summary of what is known
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let us rehearse the few facts known of the inconspicuous life of Thomas Traherne— Quiller-Couch

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or a second or third or oft-repeated telling
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designed to fool the easily fooled ... it rehearsed all the lies with which we are now familiar— Shirer

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or a going over and over something in one's mind, or with another person, or in privacy before relating or some-times performing or presenting it to others or to an audience
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Mr. Hynes hesitated a little longer .... He seemed to be rehearsing the piece in his mind— Joyce

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felt certain . . . that his smile was as he had rehearsed it, polished and genially satanic— Hervey

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Recite and the more common recount imply greater particularity of detail than the preceding terms; in fact, the implication of enumeration or of mention of each particular is so strong that both verbs usually take a plural object; thus, one relates an experience, but he recites or recounts his experiences
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recite the events of the day

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as with all mysteries, it cannot be rationally explained, merely recountedShirer

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Narrate suggests the employment of devices characteristic of the literary narrative such as plot, creation of suspense, and movement toward a climax
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what verse can sing, what prose narrate the butcher deeds of bloody Fate— Burns

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the discovery of Madeira is narrated with all the exaggerations of romance— Southey

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Describe usually implies emphasis upon details that give the hearers or readers a clear picture or that give not only a visual representation but one that appeals to the other senses
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bitter sea and glowing light, bright clear air, dry as dry,—that describes the placeJefferies

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described her ... as "a dear little thing. Rather brainy, but quite a nice little thing"— Gibbons

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State stresses particularity, clearness, and definiteness of detail, and suggests the aim of presenting material (as facts, ideas, or feelings) in their naked truth so that they will be distinctly understood or fixed in others' minds
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Dryden's words ... are precise, they state immensely, but their suggestiveness is often nothing— T. S. Eliot

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one should know what one thinks and what one means, and be able to state it in clear terms— Rose Macaulay

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Report implies a recounting and narrating, often after investigation, for the information of others
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report the progress on defense projects to the cabinet

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he was assigned to report the murder trial for the local newspaper

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in his letters Thaddeus reported approaching an island in an outrigger one evening— Cheever

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Analogous words: tell, *reveal, disclose, divulge: detail, itemize, particularize (see corresponding adjectives at CIRCUMSTANTIAL)
2 associate, link, connect, *join, conjoin, combine, unite
Analogous words: attach, *fasten, fix: refer, assign, credit, impute, *ascribe
Contrasted words: disengage, *detach, abstract: divorce, sever, sunder, *separate
3 *bear, pertain, appertain, belong, apply

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • relate — re‧late [rɪˈleɪt] verb relate to something phrasal verb [transitive] to be directly connected with something or affected by it: • expenses relating to the company s trading activities * * * relate UK US /rɪˈleɪt/ verb ► [T] to find or show the… …   Financial and business terms

  • Relate — Re*late (r? l?t ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Related}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Relating}.] [F. relater to recount, LL. relatare, fr. L. relatus, used as p. p. of referre. See {Elate}, and cf. {Refer}.] 1. To bring back; to restore. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • relate to — concern. → relate relate to feel sympathy for or identify with. → relate …   English new terms dictionary

  • relate — I (establish a connection) verb affect, affiliate, ally, appertain to, apply, associate, bear upon, bracket, concern, connect, consociate, correlate, draw a parallel, filiate, group, have a bearing on, identify, integrate, interconnect,… …   Law dictionary

  • relate — The verb has a long history, being first recorded in Caxton. In the 20c it acquired a jargon based meaning ‘to have an attitude of personal sympathy towards’: • Group formation such as takes place in the classroom tends to be adult centred and… …   Modern English usage

  • relate — ► VERB 1) give an account of. 2) (be related) be connected by blood or marriage. 3) establish a causal connection between: many drowning accidents are related to alcohol use. 4) (relate to) have reference to; concern. 5) (relate to …   English terms dictionary

  • relate — [ri lāt′] vt. related, relating [< L relatus, pp. of referre, to bring back: see REFER] 1. to tell the story of or give an account of; narrate; recount 2. to connect or associate, as in thought or meaning; show as having to do with; show a… …   English World dictionary

  • Relate — Re*late , v. i. 1. To stand in some relation; to have bearing or concern; to pertain; to refer; with to. [1913 Webster] All negative or privative words relate positive ideas. Locke. [1913 Webster] 2. To make reference; to take account. [R. &… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • relaté — relaté, ée (re la té, tée) part. passé de relater. 1°   Raconté. Les faits relatés dans le procès verbal. 2°   Mentionné. L acte relaté dans cette transaction. La pièce relatée ci dessus. On dirait de même : l acte susrelaté, la pièce susrelatée …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • relate to — (someone) to understand and feel sympathy for someone. The kids need a teacher who can relate to them …   New idioms dictionary

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